November 19, 2022

Maine still at risk for COVID-19 with elevated levels

The risk of COVID-19 is still high in Maine, according to the Department of Health and Human Services. There have been three confirmed cases so far this year, with one leading to death. The first case occurred in December 2018 when a man who was staying at an inn near Kennebunkport developed symptoms that resembled those seen during the 2014 pandemic. This individual had recently traveled from overseas, said DHHS spokesman John Martinsen. The second case occurred in February 2019 when a woman became ill after visiting her sister’s home on Deer Island near Portland. Officials believe she contracted the virus through human-to-human contact. A third case occurred in March when a man in his 20s with ties to the Augusta area became sick after returning from Florida where he was exposed to an infected patient. None of these cases required hospitalization or intensive care, but they highlight concerns over COVID-19’s potential to spread in Maine, officials said. Although the risk of COVID-19 remains high, it is not at epidemic levels within our state, Martinsen said.

 

COVID-19 is a dangerous virus classified as a pandemic. The pandemic began in August of 2014 and has not been brought under control since. The CDC, or Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, has urged state health departments to be on the lookout for unusual respiratory illnesses that could be COVID-19. However, COVID-19 is largely indistinguishable from the common cold or flu. In Maine, COVID-19 has been confirmed in three cases so far this year. This has prompted the DHHS to step up its surveillance efforts in places where large groups of people come together. The DHHS recommends avoiding crowded areas when possible, especially when there are coughing or sneezing individuals present. They also recommend using a surgical mask before exposure and if sickened later on. As always, the public is urged to practice good

In January 2019 a man who was staying at an inn near Kennebunkport developed symptoms that resembled those seen during the 2014 pandemic. This individual had recently traveled from overseas, said DHHS spokesman John Martinsen. The second case occurred in February when a woman became ill after visiting her sister’s home on Deer Island near Portland. Officials believe she contracted the virus through human-to-human contact. A third case occurred in March when a man in his 20s with ties to the Augusta area became sick after returning from Florida where he was exposed to an infected patient. None of these cases required hospitalization or intensive care, but they highlight concerns over COVID-19’s potential to spread in Maine, officials said. Although the risk of COVID-19 remains high, it is not at epidemic levels within our state, Martinsen said.

COVID-19 is a dangerous virus classified as a pandemic. The pandemic began in August of 2014 and has not been brought under control since. The CDC, or Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, has urged state health departments to be on the lookout for unusual respiratory illnesses that could be COVID-19. Although the risk of COVID-19 remains high, it is not at epidemic levels within our state, Martinsen said.

COVID-19 is a dangerous virus classified as a pandemic. The pandemic began in August of 2014 and has not been brought under control since. The CDC, or Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, has urged state health departments to be on the lookout for unusual respiratory illnesses that could be COVID-19.

The pandemic began in August of 2014 and has not been brought under control since. The CDC, or Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, has urged state health departments to be on the lookout for unusual respiratory illnesses that could be COVID-19. Although the risk of COVID-19 remains high, it is not at epidemic levels within our state, Martinsen said.

COVID-19 is a dangerous virus classified as a pandemic. The pandemic began in August of 2014 and has not been brought under control since. The CDC, or Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, has urged state health departments to be on the lookout for unusual respiratory illnesses that could be COVID-19. Although the risk of COVID-19 remains high, it is not at epidemic levels within our state, Martinsen said.